Archivo: The New York Times

A century ago, British scientists suggested a link between increased hygiene and allergic conditions — the first hint that our immune systems are becoming improperly “trained.”

Computer programming once had much better gender balance than it does today. What went wrong?

Axions? Phantom energy? Astrophysicists scramble to patch a hole in the universe, rewriting cosmic history in the process.

Researchers matched up a jigsaw puzzle of ice that once flowed between two landmasses now separated by an ocean.

Known as “Ugly Foot” or “Hobbit Foot,” researchers say the feathered specimen offers long-sought clues to the evolutionary path of birds.

The fossil of an ancient animal teaches a sad lesson: Cancer has been around for a very, very long time.

Rather than a scientific given, calendars say a lot about the history and cultural values of the societies that created them.

The smiling salamanders can regrow most of their body parts, so researchers are building improved maps of their DNA.

“When I first saw it, I just said ‘What?!’ and didn’t speak for a while,” said one of the researchers who studied the fossils of a prehistoric marine reptile.

The pace of space rocks pummeling Earth and the moon was relatively infrequent, but then doubled or tripled for unknown reasons, a new study finds.