Archivo: The New York Times

Long ago, Neanderthals probably infected modern humans with viruses, perhaps even an ancient form of H.I.V. But our extinct relatives also gave us genetic defenses.

During mating season, the solitary mammals bleat important information to each other through their dense bamboo habitat.

BASF calls itself “the largest chemical producer in the world.” The German company has acquired nearly half of the 13,000 patents derived from 862 marine organisms genetic sequences.

Doctors and scientists say microwave strikes may have caused sonic delusions and very real brain damage among embassy staff and family members.

Eugene N. Parker predicted the existence of solar wind in 1958. The NASA spacecraft is the first named for a living person.

As a science journalist, I’ve written several articles to quell vaccine angst and encourage immunization. But lately, I’ve noticed that the cloud of fear surrounding vaccines is having another nefarious effect: It is eroding the integrity of vaccine science.

Retracing the steps of a century-old wildlife survey, ecologists find that birds are making remarkable adaptations to climate change.

More than a thousand variations in DNA were involved in how long people stayed in school, but the effect of each gene was weak, and the data did not predict educational attainment for individuals.

Among the many sub-disciplines of physics are quantum mechanics, cosmology and the physics of fruit.

The mortality rate flattens among the oldest of the old, a study of elderly Italians concludes, suggesting that the oldest humans have not yet reached the limits of life span.