Archivo: Nature News

Pathogen related to polio and common cold could be the cause — but little is known for sure.

Millions of men bear the genetic legacy of Genghis Khan, the famously fertile Mongolian ruler who died in 1227. Researchers have now recognized ten other men whose fecundity has left a lasting impression on present-day populations. The team’s study points to sociopolitical factors that foster such lineages, but the identities of the men who left their genetic stamp remains unknown.

Critics of genetic engineering have long worried about the risk of modified organisms escaping into the environment. A biological-containment strategy described this week in Nature has the potential to put some of those fears to rest and to pave the way for greater use of engineered organisms in areas such as agriculture, medicine and environmental clean-up.

Women shy away from fields in which talent, not hard work, is thought to be key, survey suggests.

Microscopes make living cells and tissues appear bigger. But what if we could actually make the things bigger?

An ‘essentially unbeatable’ algorithm for the popular card game points to strategies for solving real-life problems without having complete information.

Companies and clinicians turn to ketamine to treat mental-health disorder as pipeline of new drugs dries up.

In a mountain meadow in Colorado, ecologists have come across yet another example of the amazing interconnectedness of nature’s flora and fauna. Black bears, by eating ants, help one of the meadow’s key plant species thrive.

Super-pressure technology could keep gamma-ray telescope aloft for 100 days or more around Antarctica.

Researchers aim to set aside differences in search for life on distant spheres.