Archivo: The New York Times

To spread forth and multiply, fungi — including the familiar button, portobello and shiitake mushrooms — shoot their spores into wafting breezes.

Maryam Mirzakhani, an Iranian mathematician who was the only woman ever to win a Fields Medal, the most prestigious honor in mathematics, died on Saturday. She was 40.

Corals that live up to hundreds of feet below the ocean’s surface have worked out a special arrangement with algae that’s mutually beneficial for the two.

As early humans migrated into colder northern climates, a genetic mutation that knocks about a centimeter off height and increases the risk of osteoarthritis by up to 80 percent may have helped some of them survive the most recent ice age.

A new genetic analysis finds that ancient Africans walked into Europe 270,000 years ago, much earlier than previously known, and interbred with Neanderthals.

Scientists developed a model to predict the spread of pin-tailed whydahs, and found they could strain native bird species in California, Texas and elsewhere.

In the most comprehensive study of egg shapes to date, scientists say that the best predictor of long or pointy eggs is a bird’s flying ability.

Physicists monitoring the Large Hadron Collider are seeking clues to a theory that will answer deeper questions about the cosmos. But the silence from the frontier has been ominous.

Pasteur was an artist. And without his early creative explorations, he may not have made one of his most monumental, but least talked about, discoveries in science, one with far-reaching implications.

A study published Friday in Science Advances shows, for the first time, that European eels might link magnetic cues with the tides to navigate. Studying juveniles during the crucial stage when they move toward land from open ocean, the authors found that eels faced different directions based on whether the tide was flowing in (flood tide) or out (ebb tide).