Archivo: Science Alert

From orbit, this landscape on Mars looks like a lacy honeycomb or a spider web. But the unusual polygon-shaped features aren’t created by Martian bees or spiders; they are actually formed from an ongoing process of seasonal change from created from water ice and carbon dioxide.

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A strange gap between theoretical predictions and experimental results in a major neutrino research project could be a sign of the elusive ‘sterile’ neutrino – a particle so quiet, it can only be detected by the silence it leaves in its wake.

Climate change is slowing down the conveyor belt of ocean currents that brings warm water from the tropics up to the North Atlantic.

Our planet’s protective shell isn’t quite what it used to be. Over the past two centuries its magnetic strength has taken a nosedive, and nobody has the foggiest idea why.

The Kīlauea volcano in Hawaii is said to be the world’s most active volcano, and yet we still don’t really know how it was born.

Earth’s interior is a far from quiet place. Deep below our surface activities, the planet rumbles with activity, from plate tectonics to convection currents that circulate through the hot magmatic fluids far underneath the crust.

Earth’s auroras are a glorious wonder, but our planet isn’t the only place in the Solar System where these phenomena can be found.

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In spite of its location midway down the eastern seaboard of the continent of South America, Uruguay’s brief history is a blur of European conflict, shaped by the colonial interests of Spanish, British, and Portuguese powers.

A major milestone in particle physics has just been made at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

Barely a year after the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) broke one record for fusion, it’s smashed it again, this time holding onto a churning whirlpool of 100 million degree plasma for a whole 30 seconds.